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DCYS Program: The Youthful Level of Service/Case Management Inventory (YLS/CMI) and Supervision Levels

Your JSO will collect information from many different sources to develop a plan to help you succeed. She will work with you to figure out what your strengths are so we can build on them. Your JSO will also help you figure out what you need to work on to stay out of trouble. Here are some of the tools your JSO will use to assist you:

Youthful Level of Service/Case Management Inventory (YLS/CMI) -

The YLS/CMI is an instrument that has been tested on youth who are similar to you. It measures how you are doing in eight different areas of your life. Those eight areas were chosen because youth who have weaknesses in those areas are more likely to get into trouble again. The YLS/CMI is not a “test”; there are no right or wrong answers. The YLS/CMI focuses on what has happened with you during the last 6 to 12 months. The areas of focus are:

  • Prior and Current Offenses – This area looks at all of your charges and how you did if you were on probation before.
  • Family Circumstances and Parenting – This looks at how you get along at home.
  • Education/Employment – If you are still in school, this area looks at your grades, attendance and behavior in school. If you are not in school, it looks at your employment.
  • Peer Relations – This refers to who your friends are and who you spend most of your time with.
  • Substance Abuse – This looks at your substance abuse (drug and alcohol use) if you have any, and how your usage has affected your life.
  • Leisure/Recreation – This looks at your interests and how you spend your free time.
  • Personality and Behavior – This area refers to how you see yourself and how you deal with problems.
  • Attitudes/Orientation – This refers to how you react to authority and your attitudes regarding your behavior.

Prior and Current Offenses is the only area that cannot improve over time. Your criminal history is what it is. All of the other areas can improve with help. When your JSO completes the YLS/CMI, some of the focus areas above will show your strengths, as well as the areas that you need to work on. If you happen to have a high need in a particular area, that doesn’t mean that you are bad or wrong. It simply shows you something you need to work on, and if you improve in those areas, you have a better chance of staying out of trouble. Your officer will start with areas that you need the most help in and develop a plan to help you improve. The YLS/CMI identifies four risk levels:

  • Low Risk – This means that you are doing pretty well overall and you only need a little bit of help to stay out of trouble.
  • Moderate Risk – This means that you need a bit more help to stay out of trouble.
  • High Risk – You have some things that you really need to work on to stay out of trouble.
  • Very High Risk – This means that there is a pretty good chance you’ll get into trouble again if you don’t get help.

Supervision Levels – The amount of contact you have with your JSO depends upon your risk level. If you have a low risk score, you will not need to meet with your JSO as often as someone with a higher score. Even if you start with a higher risk score, you can move to a lower level of supervision as you show improvement. The minimum contact requirements for each level are:

Low Risk

  • Two face-to-face contacts per month. One of those contacts cannot be in the office.
  • One contact per month with a parent
  • Two collateral contacts per month – A collateral contact is someone else who could give information about how you’re doing. This could be a parent, teacher, employer, etc.

Moderate Risk

  • Four face-to-face contacts per month. One of those contacts cannot be in the office.
  • Four collateral contacts per month.
  • One contact per month with a parent.

High Risk

  • Eight face-to-face contacts per month. Two of those contacts cannot be in the office.
  • Six collateral contacts per month.
  • One contact per month with a parent.

Very High Risk

  • Twelve face-to-face contacts per month. Four of those contacts cannot be in the office.
  • Eight collateral contacts per month.
  • One contact per month with a parent.