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National Cyber Security Awareness Month

Monday, October 10, 2016 (All day)

Week 2 - Cyber Security from the Break Room to the Board Room

Cyber Security is a shared responsibility and we each have a role to play.

We are all part of protecting personal and organizational data in the workplace. From Commissioners to incoming entry-level employees, our cybersecurity posture is reliant on a shared level of vigilance and awareness. Week 2 looks at how every person can promote a culture of cybersecurity at work and at home.

Everyone should:

  • Become a cybersecurity advocate in your home, office, and community.
  • Make your passwords complex. Use a combination of numbers, symbols, and letters (uppercase and lowercase).
  • Change your passwords regularly (every 45 to 90 days).
  • Do NOT give any of your usernames, passwords, or other computer/ website access codes to anyone.
  • Do NOT open emails, links, or attachments from strangers.
  • At work, do NOT install or connect any personal software or hardware to your organization’s network without permission from your IT department.
  • At work, report all suspicious or unusual problems with your computer to your IT department.

Join the Twitter Chat: Creating a Culture of Cybersecurity at Work, Oct 13 at 3 p.m. ET #ChatSTC

Don't forget your mobile devices:

Cyber security is not limited just to your work computer. Mobile devices enable us to get online wherever we are. Although mobile devices —from smart watches to phones and tables — can be extremely useful and convenient, there are also potential threats users may face with such technology. It’s important to understand how to protect yourself when connecting on the go.

 DID YOU KNOW?

According to the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project, May 2013:

  • 56 percent of American adults own a smartphone (imagine how many more adults have acquired a smartphone in the past three years).
  • More than half of mobile application (app) users have uninstalled or decided not to install an app due to concerns about their personal information.

 SIMPLE TIPS for MOBILE SECURITY

  1. Use strong passwords. Change any default passwords on your mobile device to ones that would be difficult for someone to guess. Use different passwords for different programs and devices. Do not choose options that allow your device to remember your passwords.
  2. Keep software up to date. Install updates for apps and your device’s operating system as soon as they are available. Keeping the software on your mobile device up to date will prevent attackers from being able to take advantage of known vulnerabilities.
  3. Disable remote connectivity. Some mobile devices are equipped with wireless technologies, such as Bluetooth, that can connect to other devices. Disable these features when they are not in use.
  4. Be careful what you post and when. Wait to post pictures from trips and events so that people do not know where to find you. Posting where you are also reminds others that your house is empty.
  5. Guard your mobile device. In order to prevent theft and unauthorized access, never leave your mobile device unattended in a public place and lock your device with a passcode when it is not in use.
  6. Know your apps. Be sure to review and understand the details of an app before downloading and installing it. Be aware that apps may request access to your location and personal information. Delete any apps that you do not use regularly to increase your security.
  7. Know the available resources. Use the Federal Communications Commission’s Smartphone Security Checker at www.fcc.gov/smartphone-security. Here you will find steps to smartphone security for your specific type of device.

Create Long and Strong Passwords

 

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